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a question? tweet cramer, #madtweets. send jim an e-mail to "mad money"@cnbc.com. or give us a call. 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney@cnbc.com. revolutionizing an industry can be a tough act to follow, but at xerox we've embraced a new role. working behind the scenes to provide companies with services... like helping hr departments manage benefits and pensions for over 11 million employees. reducing document costs by up to 30%... and processing $421 billion dollars in accounts payables each year. helping thousands of companies simplify how work gets done. how's that for an encore? with xerox, you're ready for real busi. >>> just because the market had a fabulous day today doesn't mean you can afford to stop playing some defense with high-needing food stocks that can thrive, even when the global economy is in dire straits. take long-time cramer fave b & g foods, neglected brands from larger players, private equity firms, and bringing them back to it life. you might know b & g as pickles. b & g just reported last thursday and the company delivered an excellent quarter wit
delegation heads to washington this week. jim clancy has more. >> reporter: north korea's response to the call of diplomacy has been blustery at best. it demands the world recognize its nuclear and ballistic missile programs as its sovereign right.in exchange for even sitting down to talk >> kim jong un probably feeling very insecure and very unstable. and the more unstable and more insecure he feels, the more the need to hold on to, to cling onto this ultimate weapon of destruction, nuclear weapons. because this is the only thing that could ensure the continuation of the kim dynasty. >> reporter: the west hopes kim jong un's weeks-long propaganda outburst will cause china to make a fundamental shift in its support for pyongyang. that may be answered in a series of meetings in china and washington this week. >> if any country in the world has leverage in dealing with north korea and maybe to the point where north korea will be forced to actually give up, contemplate giving up on its nuclear weapons program, it's china. >> reporter: beijing's interest will be its own. it's about wha
korea. jim maseda joins us from seoul. hi, jim. >> reporter: hi, kelly. well, the past 24 hours have been a pretty good example of the unpredictability of kim junk union and his scene. after all of those signals, it turned out to be a very quiet day in north korea, focused entirely on those celebrations around founding father kim jong il's birthday. but then last night, there was a sudden new threat from the north korean military, which said it would strike south korea without warning if there were another anti-north protest in the south. so this was in reaction to a very small demonstration yesterday here in downtown seoul where a couple of effigies of kim jong un were burned. in the same message, he said the south must apologize for its undig phied acts before talks could happen. despite the angry ultimatum, there does seem to be a shift now towards what they call offramping or tamping down the volume and talking rather than confrontation. that said, those two medium range missiles are reportedly on their launchers in the eastern part of north korea ready to be fired. the south is
colleagues are really smart. they don't need a long windup. so we'll start with jim goodbee and then chris nelson. the mic is coming. over there. >> thank you. well, thank you all for a terrific set of comments. you asked whether there was something left out. i think there was one point that i regard as tremendously important that was left out, and that is the closing -- at least temporarily -- of cay song. cay song complex. that, to me, is the most notable difference between this crisis and all previous ones. and at least to even ask to we really know who's in charge? who are the right people to talk to? in the early days of the kim jong un administration, there was some talk about market economy, small farmers and so forth having nor -- more rights. that's all disappeared. it that he discovered -- is it that he discovered that was something he had to back down? these are questions in my mind that i wonder if you could comment at least on the question of cay song and whether that isn't a fairly significantly difference from previous episodes we faced. thank you will have. >> jim raises a
30 victims who were missing a limb. abc's jim avila reports on how this tragedy unfolded. >> reporter: two hours after the winners crossed, 4:09 into the race, the amateur runners still filling boston's boylston street, two rapid-fire explosions at the finish line. >> something just blew up! [ explosion ] >> run! go! >> reporter: turning the cherished boston marathon into what one hospital official called a war zone. >> i crossed the 26-mile marker and i saw the first explosion happen. there was some commotion. i saw a fire and smoke. and i didn't know what it was. and then from about me to where that gentleman is standing over there, i literally saw the garbage barrel explode. i saw the flash, the fire, the smoke, and i just ran as fast as i could. >> reporter: cameras were rolling from many angles as the force of the blast actually knocks over at least within of the marathoners. look again. most of the injuries, though, suffered by spectators who came to celebrate the finish. >> a bomb went off. and it knocked me to the ground. and then, you know, everybody started running, panickin
of estimates as asian demand for its software dropped. still, in an interview with cnbc earlier, co-ceo jim hagueman sounded confident that growth in the asia pacific region was still solid. >> in asia, we have had now 13 consecutive quarters of double digit growth. 12, actually. this is the first time we have an issue in asia. what that means is you have an organization that has been growing rapidly. with that comes new demand on leadership. we have been make something changes. in q1 we had a couple of key countries where we were looking for the leadership to take this organization to the next level. that's why it's impacting q1. but if i look at the pipeline and the business out there, we have a very, very solid business also in asia pacific. >> they also said revenue from sap's cloud technology division was a bright spot in the report, jumping 380% from a year earlier. he responded to speculation the company might make its cloud service private, as well. >> we do see what cloud does for our customers is it radically simplifies complexity. running global supply chains is not ease or realt
be calls for negotiation with this government. bear in mind that these are all legitimize jim jong un's rule. whatever else they do, they are a signal to home that this guy has engainled the outside world on his own terms. it reads very well back home. of course the north koreaian side wants face-saving solutions. given his calculations and the circumstances of this state, i submit that kim jong un and company can stand to lose a little face when they play this way. they deserve to, and if we are smart, we will range that outcome dwsharge that outcome every time we have a pleasant situation like this. thank you. >> thank you. my lane in the road is south korea. south korea's approach, military reform since 2010. it will be perhaps a bit more tactical. cumulatively, south korea is much more likely to respond to a clash. i think the situation has changed not only in the blue house but in the lay of the land as well as the political landscape. first of all, the new south koreaian president has vowed publicly and in private to respond forcibly and really exponentially, the next time nort
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7